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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

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"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 11.3 February 2000

Bare ground and the conservation of invertebrates

By - Roger Key

Exposed soil, devoid of vegetation, is not often considered to be a valuable habitat. Such bare ground is regularly viewed by conservation - and other land-managers as a negative feature, the results of unwelcome erosion, in need of remedial action so that it can be colonised by vegetation. This is often most unfortunate, as bare ground is an essential habitat feature for a wide variety of organisms, including many fungi, lichens, mosses, vascular plants, reptiles, birds and a whole lot of different groups.

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist