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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

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"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 11.5 June 2000

Songs of bush-crickets and grasshoppers and the use of ultrasound detectors

By - David Baldock

The bush-crickets and grasshoppers are best known for their songs, which are almost unique in the insect world, the cicadas being the only other gruop that produces comparable sounds. In fact, the word 'cricket' is derived from the Old French onomatopoeic word 'criquer', meaning 'to crackle'. All the British species of bush-cricket, cricket, mole-cricket and grasshopper produce songs using various techniques; only the groundhoppers are silent.

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist