The magazine for the modern naturalist About Contact Back issues Shop Help Subscribe

"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

The East Thames Corridor: a nationally important invertebrate fauna under threat

By - Peter Harvey

As well as the relatively well-known invertebrate fauna of the Thames coastal marshes, there are several ecological groups of species respresented in the region, which are frequently found together at sites near the Thames. These are species that are normally associated with heathland and sandy habitats (for example, the Red Data Book (RDB) mining-bee Andrena florea - Fig. 1), species that are coastal and often found on dune systems, and species of calcareous or chalk grassland habitats.

Buy this issue Subscribe now

"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist