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From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 13.1 October 2001

Identification: Wild Boar signs in southern England

By - Martin Goulding

Wild Boar Sus scrofa are once again to be found in several woodlands in southern England. Escaped captive animals from Wild Boar farms, abattoirs and wildlife collections have resulted in two free-living populations, one in Dorset and a second in Kent and East Sussex (Goulding et al. 1998). The last native free-living Wild Boar in England were thought to have died out 300 years ago as a result of over-hunting and habitat loss (Yalden 1999). As this is a former native species, our climate and woodland habitats will be to its liking and, with the extinction of the Lynx Lynx lynx and Wolf Canis lupus in Britain, these latter-day Wild Boar have no natural predators and are likely to increase in numbers and range (Goulding et al. 1998).

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist