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From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 02.2 December 1990

Indications of Antiquity - some observations on the nature of plants associated with ancient woodlands

By - Jonathan Spencer

In most districts of Britain it is possible to compile lists of plants which show a close degree of association with long-established semi-natural woodland (Peterken 1981). Oxlips, Primula elatior, for example, have been shown to be closely associated with the ancient coppice woods fo East Anglia (Rackham 1980), Hay-scented Fern, Dryopteris aemula, with the relict native woods of western Scotland (Page 1989), and a while host of mosses, liverworts and lichens with the woods of the Atlantic seaboard or the ancient forests and chases of lowland Britain (Ratcliffe 1968; Harding & Rose 1986).

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist