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From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 22.4 April 2011

Boggarts, ants and poison – The shady natural history of Dog's Mercury

By - Richard Jefferson, Keith Kirby

Dog's Mercury Mercurialis perennis is a familiar plant of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae) occurring in mostly shady habitats throughout Great Britain. There are records of the fruit and pollen of Dog's Mercury from deposits from the Hoxnian interglacial (425,000-375,000 BP) through the Bronze Age (5310-3210 BP) (Jefferson 2008), while the first historical record of the plant in Great Britain is for 1597, in Kent. 

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist