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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

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"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 26.2 December 2014

Aspen: the disappearances

By - Alan Stubbs

It should be a jolt to discover that, of Aspen invertebrates, nine insects are believed to be extinct and a further eight are UK Priority Species. Others are on the slippery slope. The possible reasons need to be understood so as to circumvent further losses and declines of wildlife associated with this somewhat overlooked tree.

Asked to name the most important woodland trees, few people would have Aspen Populus tremula on the tip of their tongue. The main exception is in the Scottish Highlands, where important assemblages of Aspen-dependent insects, fungi and lichens are now well recognised (2005, BW  17: 107–115). 

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist