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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

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"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 28.2 December 2016

Dredged sediment – still an under-used conservation resource

By - Malcolm Ausden, Mark Dixon, Leigh Lock, Rosie Miles, Nathan Richardson, Colin Scott

Every year in the UK, large quantities of sediment are dredged to maintain access to our ports and harbours. Although much of this dredged sediment could be used to protect and enhance our coastal habitats, the great majority is deposited away from our coasts. The authors describe some examples of the use of dredgings to create valuable coastal habitats, and what needs to be done to encourage more such use.

The process of regularly dredging sediment from the berths and navigation chanels of our ports and harbours is economically vital to this country. In the UK, an estimated 40-50 million cubic metres of material is dredged annually. The majority of these dredgings are deposited at sea, with no more than 1% used to restore or create valuable coastal habitats (Bolam & Whomersley 2005; MMO 2014).

 

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist