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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

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From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 03.5 June 1992

British Boletes

By - Peter Marren

Boletus is a Roman word, adapted from the Greek bolus, meaning lump. By 'boletus', the Latin authors evidently meant Amanita caesarea, 'Caesar's mushroom', but the name has since been transferred to another group of fungi, the boletes, equally good to eat but having pores instead of gills. It suits them: 'lumpy' is indeed a good word to describe the 'average' bolete, for it is a homely 'chubby' fungus, a cap like a penny bun topping a squat, 'obese' stem, like two lumps of plasticine.

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More from 'BW 3.5 - June 1992 '

"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist