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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

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"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 31.5 June 2020

The decline of the Great Ouse valley floodplain meadows

By - Martin Baker, Pat Doody

The Domesday book recorded the floodplain meadows of the River Great Ouse as ten times more valuable than arable land. But these important meadows have declined by around 97% in the last 50 years. Patrick Doody and Martin Baker explore the history and wildlife of the Great Ouse valley floodplain meadows and provide a detailed account of the losses this habitat has suffered. 

The River Great Ouse is approximately 230km long and runs from Northamptonshire to The Wash in a roughly northeasterly direction. In the upper catchment, although a highly regulated waterway, it largely follows its original course until it reaches Earith. There, a sluice controls excess river flows, diverting them on to the Ouse Washes, a Special Area of Conservation (SAC), via the Old Bedford River.

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist