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Matthew Oates, National Trust

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"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 33.3 December 2021

British elephants

By - Peter Marren

Up until approximately half a million years ago, Britain was once connected to continental Europe and shared much of its natural flora and fauna, including elephants. Peter Marren takes us back to explore Britain’s lost prehistoric elephant species and describes their role in shaping the landscape.

Once, not long ago as geological time is measured, the world was full of elephants. There were at least three species in North America and two in South America. There were four in Eurasia and four more in Africa. There were elephants in polar latitudes, as well as in the tropics. There were elephants adapted to forest or savanna or grassy northern plains. The only land masses free of elephants were Australia and Antarctica.

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist