The magazine for the modern naturalist About Contact Back issues Shop Help Subscribe

"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 33.4 February 2022

The valley headwater fens of the Norfolk–Suffolk border

By - Rowena Langston

Forming part of the Norfolk-Suffolk border, the valleys of the Little Ouse and Waveney Rivers hold the largest surviving valley fen in England. Rowena Langston outlines the origins, character and species features of the Norfolk-Suffolk fens, while exploring the associated challenges for habitat restoration and conservation.

The upper valleys of the Little Ouse and Waveney Rivers, which form the county boundary between Norfolk and Suffolk, hold one of the most important concentrations of valley headwater fens in western Europe (Figure 1; Table 1). Fens of this type not only are rare in their own right but also support many nationally scarce plants and invertebrates.

Buy this issue Subscribe now

"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist