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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 04.5 June 1993

Conservation or Greening? The Challenge of Post-industrial Landscapes

By - John Box

The industrial cycle, from extraction through processing and transport to final disposal, is often associated with the destruction of wildlife habitats, but it can also create new and sometimes exceptionally rich areas for wildlife and geological features. Industrial processes have left abandoned spoil heaps and derelict sites for plant and animal colonists. Mineral workings can provide new geological exposures as well as opportunities for natural recolonisation. For example, open-cast mining for coal and clay at Stoney Hill, to the west of Telford in Shropshire, was abandoned in the mid-1960s, leaving deep pools of water surrounded by mounds of acid clays and coal spoil, as well as more basic clays.

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More from 'BW 4.5 - June 1993 '

"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist