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From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 06.4 April 1995

Identification – Tiger Moths

By - Paul Waring

Tiger moths are boldly marked with patches of orange, red, black and brown, like the big cats from which they get their common name. There are six species resident in Britain. They are members of the family Arctiidae. The wing markings of the adults are so striking that they are unlikely to be confused with other British moths.

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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist