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"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement"

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist

From issue:   Issue:   British Wildlife 08.5 June 1997

Superior Merits of a Troublesome Weed – Elder in the 1990s

By - H D V Prendergast, F Dennis

From early spring to late summer Blackthorn, Prunus spinosa, Hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna, Elder, Sambucus nigra, and Bramble, Rubus fruticosus, succeed each other in streaking our hedgerows white - and, in more or less reverse order, have their fruits consumed by birds (Snow & Snow 1988). Like the others, Elder has been a notable part of the British landscape in other ways, too. It was, for example, mentioned as a boundary feature in Anglo-Saxon charters (Rackham 1986), and its uses and folklore have been so legion that its entry in Mrs Grieve's famous A Modern Herbal (first published in 1931; see Grieve 1980) exceeds that of any other species.

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More from 'BW 8.5 - June 1997 '

"British Wildlife is the pulsating heart of the UK nature conservation movement."

Matthew Oates, National Trust

"The most important and informative publication on wildlife of our times"

Michael McCarthy, The Independent

"Packed with readable, thoughtful, up to date articles; written by ecologists and naturalists for ecologists and naturalists"

Nick Baker, Presenter and Naturalist